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  1. Tutorial Downloads .com
  2. J2ME Tutorial
  3. NetBeans J2ME Tutorial
  4. J2ME Tutorial: Introduction to J2ME

Beginning J2ME: From Novice to Professional, Third Edition. Copyright . Programming a Custom User Interface. . Sun's J2ME Wireless Toolkit Emulators. J2ME: The Complete Reference. James Keogh. McGraw-Hill/Osborne. New York PC Programming nationally in his Popular J2ME and Wireless Devices. 2. Wireless Java 2 ME Platform Programming. The creators of the J2ME platform delineated pervasive devices into two distinct categories.

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J2me Tutorial Pdf

J2ME Programming AWT/Swing: J2ME has its own GUI classes motorola. com/docstools/technicalarticles/Bluetooth_pdf. The Java Card technology defines: – A subset of the Java programming language and virtual machine definition suitable for smart card applications. – Core and. Introduction. This tutorial assumes that you have some familiarity with general programming concepts and the Java language.

The developer-directed class verification stage is called MIDlet preverification, which occurs after the class is compiled. What Tasks Preverification Completes[ edit ] Generally, the preverification task annotates the class files with notes that the small incomplete class verifier in the Mobile VM reads and uses to do a fast class verification to enable the Mobile VM to then run the resulting bytecodes. The resulting bytecodes are valid bytecodes, because the annotations are using attributes of the bytecode to make the notes for the Mobile VM to read in doing its final incomplete class verification. Byte code attributes must be the proper length. The class file cannot be truncated or have extra bytes at end. Constant pool must not contain any superficial data.

Now you have reached the stage where you can deploy the MIDlet directly on your mobile device. There are two ways to do this.

The first is via a network connection between your computer and your handset. This can either be via a USB cable or a Bluetooth wireless connection, depending on your device.

Most Java-enabled devices will allow you to install J2ME applications via this connection. Second, and the one that is more interesting, because it opens up your MIDlet to the outside world, is via the Internet. After all, what good is your MIDlet if the rest of the world cannot see it? Of course, this means that your device should be able to connect to the Internet using its internal browser.

Before you proceed further, recall that when you created the JAD file, you entered two attributes in it that specified the version of CLDC 1. Since the DateTimeApp MIDlet does not use any of the features of these versions, it should theoretically run on devices that support the lower versions of these attributes, as well.

If this is the case with your device, fear not! If this is the case with your device, or the device that you are going to test this MIDlet on, simply change these values in the JAD file and you are good to go. To be able to deploy your MIDlet via the Internet, you need to have access to a web server with a real-world IP address or domain name.

For the Apache web server, modify the mime. Next, create an HTML file that will become the point of reference. The HTML doesn't need to be anything fancy. Don't forget that users will be accessing this page via a mobile device, so it is prudent to keep the size of this page to the minimum.

This is shown in Listing 2. However, since this is now going to be accessed via a web server over the Internet, it is advisable to make this link absolute instead of relative.

Now, anyone with a mobile device that can browse the Internet should be able to point to your DateTimeApp. For those who don't have access to a web server, I have uploaded these files to my web server. That's it! You have completed all the steps required to manually create and deploy a MIDlet. This process has helped you to understand what goes on behind the scenes and given you confidence in all the steps of MIDlet creation.

Because a lot of these steps are repetitive, it makes sense to use an automated tool. This is where the Wireless Toolkit comes in, and you will use it to create the rest of the MIDlets in this article series. For the moment, let's recreate the same MIDlet using this Toolkit so that you can get familiar with its interface. Let's explore the contents of this folder. Figure 4 shows these contents as they should now look on your machine.

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Figure 4. Wireless Toolkit folder contents Note that the default installation of the Toolkit would not have created the article folder, and that you created it in the previous section. As far as a MIDlet developer is concerned, the most important folders are the apps and bin folders, but here is a short summary of each of these folders. Folder Folder Description Name appdb Directory that acts as a simulation for mobile device file system apps MIDlets created using the Toolkit reside in this directory bin Contains executables for the various tools, including the Toolkit itself, and various other tools like the preverifier and the emulator The Wireless Toolkit documentation including API documentation for MIDP 2.

Browse this folder, and you will notice several example MIDlets provided in their own folders. These have their own directory structure that allows clean separation of source code, libraries, and rest of the files associated with a MIDlet project. The bin folder contains the executables for the Toolkit.

J2ME Tutorial

The most important one is ktoolbar. This folder contains other executables as well, some of which we came across earlier for example, preverify.

Let us, however, concentrate on using the Toolkit now by running the ktoolbar. The Toolkit will start and you will get the window shown in Figure 5. Figure 5. Main Toolkit window As the message in the window says, from here, you can either create a new project or open an existing one.

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When you click on the Open Project menu button, you will be presented with a list of projects. As you may have guessed, this list of projects is the directory listing of the apps folder. Selecting a project from this list will open up the project and allow you to change its settings, build it which includes compilation, preverification, and packaging and run it.

The steps of designing and coding are still to be done outside of this Toolkit. Click on New Project menu button, and enter the details in the window that comes up, as shown in Figure 6. Figure 6. Creating a new project The next window that comes up will allow you to change settings that control the target platform of your MIDlet. Figure 7. Changing project settings You can review the rest of the settings by clicking on the tabs at the top, but for the moment, your project is ready to be created.

Do so by clicking the OK button at the bottom. The project will be created with information about where to place the project files displayed on the screen, as shown in Figure 8. You can verify that the Toolkit has created a DateTimeApp folder under the apps folder by navigating to it.

Figure 8. Copy this file, DateTimeApp.

Note that the Toolkit created the fully qualified path based on the package name, so you don't have to. Once the copy is done, come back to the Toolkit, and hit the Run menu button.

The Toolkit will compile, preverify, and package, and, provided everything goes OK, will run the DateTimeApp in the emulator. Seems simple enough, doesn't it? All you had to do was to create a new project, set the settings, write the code, drop it in the right directory, and hit the Run button. Training Ends.

NetBeans J2ME Tutorial

Target devices range from industrial controls to mobile phones especially feature phones and set-top boxes. Sun provides areference implementation of the specification, but has tended not to provide free binary implementations of its Java ME runtime environment for mobile devices, rather relying on third parties to provide their own. The toolkit includes the emulation environments, performance optimization and tuning features, documentation, and examples that developers need to bring efficient and successful wireless applications to market quickly.

The toolkit can be used standalone, or incorporated into many popular integrated development environments IDEs. The Sun J2ME Wireless Toolkit supports the development of Java applications that run on devices such as cellular phones, two-way pagers, and palmtops.

J2ME Tutorial: Introduction to J2ME

In other words the "Java Wireless Toolkit 2. Java NetBeans 6. The NetBeans platform allows applications to be developed from a set of modular software components called modules. NetBeans IDE is an open-source integrated development environment. Java Eclipse 3. The initial codebase originated from VisualAge. Users can extend its abilities by installing plug-ins written for the Eclipse Platform, such as development toolkits for other programming languages, and can write and contribute their own plug-in modules.

The MIDlet program for the photo album runs successfully on the emulator, and the the task is accomplished. DAY Assigned a task of developing a searchbox based Database connection in J2ME.

Learning how to retrieve information from a database in an application. Saw some basic programs on File import from Database System, and learnt the login page development programming in J2ME. Learnt to define a user and database interface in J2ME java platform. Learnt how to install an operating system on office based systems such as Ubuntu, Windows and the various drivers required for the functioning of applications.

The main features of the project are: Artisans can make embroidery designs using computers Designs can be stored, reused and combined in various ways to create new designs. Learnt using visual MIDlets, and importing files.

And how a Client side and Server Side programming works. Work on the J2ME coding still in progress. Also started coding for the "search application".

Search Programme runs successfully on mobile phone too.

Testing the prepared applications on different mobile handsets, the application runs successfully. Project Report is ready, submitted the hard copy and soft copy to the Media Lab Asia. Training Ends. Java Platform, Micro Edition, or Java ME, is a Java platform designed for embedded systems mobile devices are one kind of such systems.

Target devices range from industrial controls to mobile phones especially feature phones and set-top boxes. Sun provides areference implementation of the specification, but has tended not to provide free binary implementations of its Java ME runtime environment for mobile devices, rather relying on third parties to provide their own.

Sun Java Wireless Toolkit: The toolkit includes the emulation environments, performance optimization and tuning features, documentation, and examples that developers need to bring efficient and successful wireless applications to market quickly.

The toolkit can be used standalone, or incorporated into many popular integrated development environments IDEs. The Sun J2ME Wireless Toolkit supports the development of Java applications that run on devices such as cellular phones, two-way pagers, and palmtops.